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What's in the book?

The Legal Stuff 2
About the Author 3
What Are Vital signs
Temperature
Hypothermia
First Aid for Hypothermia
Abnormal temperatures
Pulse
Abnormal pulse
Tachycardia
Bradycardia
Should I worry about my pulse?
Finding a pulse
What if there is no pulse?
Blood pressure
Taking Blood Pressure at Home
Hypertension
Hypotension
When to get help for abnormal blood pressure
Respiratory Rate
Panic Attack
Asthma
Congestive heart failure
When to Call an Ambulance with breathing difficulty

What Are Vital signs?

Most people are familiar with the term ‘vital signs’ (also known as vitals).

These vital signs are essential medical indications that show how our body’s life-sustaining functions are doing at that moment in time. They can give clues to possible or potential disease, as well as indicate how we are recovering.

Some people understand their own range, usually from the four main ones that are in a group of six and then they extend to about thirteen.

The four main ones are:

  • Body temperature (BT)
  • Blood pressure (BP)
  • Pulse (heart rate) (HR)
  • Breathing rate (respiratory rate) (RR)

 

Unfortunately, the normal ranges for a person’s vital signs can be misunderstood or misrepresented depending on where they get their information from. In addition, our vital signs vary depending on:

  • Age
  • Weight
  • Gender
  • General health.

They also depend on the clinical setting. ‘White coat syndrome’ affects some people’s blood pressure, pulse, breathing and even body temperature, making some or all read higher than it normally is.

It is also easy to blame higher readings on white coat syndrome when it could be a sign of a more serious blood pressure condition.

What are the 5th and 6th vital signs?

The 5th and 6th vital signs are both groups of signs and may refer to different parameters.

The “fifth vital sign (s)”.

 

  • Pain
  • Menstrual cycle
  • Oxygen saturation
  • Blood Glucose level

It is important to add that the order in the list of these vital signs are not the order or sequence that they are carried out, and blood glucose level, pain and oxygen saturation as well as pain are all part of standard observations and could be read at the same time as taking the main four vitals.

Sixth vital signs

There is no standard “sixth vital sign”; but the following are used often during extended tests or exploratory checks and are discipline dependent based on the healthcare professionals’ scope of practice.

 

  • End-tidal CO2. A measure of carbon dioxide in the blood.
  • Functional status
  • Shortness of breath
  • Gait speed. A test of gait speed assesses an individual’s functional mobility.
  • Delirium

 

Vital signs are recorded using the LOINC internationally accepted standard coding system. LOINC is the world’s most widely used terminology standard for health measurements, observations, and documents.

Even though vital signs are extremely useful in detecting or monitoring medical issues. These vital signs can be measured and monitored not just in a clinical setting or at the site of a medical emergency but at home, or work.

What Are Vital signs

 

Most people are familiar with the term ‘vital signs’ (also known as vitals).

These vital signs are essential medical indications that show how our body’s life-sustaining functions are doing at that moment in time. They can give clues to possible or potential disease, as well as indicate how we are recovering.

Some people understand their own range, usually from the four main ones that are in a group of six and then they extend to about thirteen.

The four main ones are:

  • Body temperature (BT)
  • Blood pressure (BP)
  • Pulse (heart rate) (HR)
  • Breathing rate (respiratory rate) (RR)

 

Unfortunately, the normal ranges for a person’s vital signs can be misunderstood or misrepresented depending on where they get their information from. In addition, our vital signs vary depending on:

  • Age
  • Weight
  • Gender
  • General health.

They also depend on the clinical setting. ‘White coat syndrome’ affects some people’s blood pressure, pulse, breathing and even body temperature, making some or all read higher than it normally is.

It is also easy to blame higher readings on white coat syndrome when it could be a sign of a more serious blood pressure condition.

What are the 5th and 6th vital signs?

The 5th and 6th vital signs are both groups of signs and may refer to different parameters.

The “fifth vital sign (s)”.

 

  • Pain
  • Menstrual cycle
  • Oxygen saturation
  • Blood Glucose level

It is important to add that the order in the list of these vital signs are not the order or sequence that they are carried out, and blood glucose level, pain and oxygen saturation as well as pain are all part of standard observations and could be read at the same time as taking the main four vitals.

Sixth vital signs

There is no standard “sixth vital sign”; but the following are used often during extended tests or exploratory checks and are discipline dependent based on the healthcare professionals’ scope of practice.

 

  • End-tidal CO2. A measure of carbon dioxide in the blood.
  • Functional status
  • Shortness of breath
  • Gait speed. A test of gait speed assesses an individual’s functional mobility.
  • Delirium

 

Vital signs are recorded using the LOINC internationally accepted standard coding system. LOINC is the world’s most widely used terminology standard for health measurements, observations, and documents.

Even though vital signs are extremely useful in detecting or monitoring medical issues. These vital signs can be measured and monitored not just in a clinical setting or at the site of a medical emergency but at home, or work.

.

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